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Have Fun, It’s Good For Your Health

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http://denistar.rs/?enot=bin%C3%A4re-optionen-ea binäre optionen ea Recent medical evidence suggests that a good attitude isn’t just pleasant, it’s healthy.

Learn how to trade options najarian Researchers have known for a long time that a good attitude can improve a person’s mental health, and conversely, that a negative attitude can damage mental health by fostering depression, anxiety and chronic stress.

bdswiss com demo And although the connections between body and mind have been harder to prove, more and more studies have found that stress, especially the chronic stress associated with poor mental health, can directly and indirectly deteriorate physical health.

purchase Pregabalin Stress, depression and anxiety have physiological symptoms that doctors know about, like feeling nauseous before a competition or being unable to sleep because of a pressing deadline. When stress is prolonged, for instance by a negative attitude, these types of symptoms can become chronic and worsen overall health.

option now In 2012, according to sciencedaily.com, Carnegie Mellon University conducted a study which finally proved that psychological stress does weaken the immune system, opening the door for wider medical exploration of the mind-body connection.

Priligy no prescription worldwide Dr. Lori Platt, a specialist with Methodist Physician Clinic, has witnessed this connection firsthand. “When your body is under stress, your immune system can’t fight as hard so that makes you more predisposed to illness or disease,” she said. “[And] constantly focusing on what is bothering you can make the symptoms of any illness feel more acute than they actually are.”

opcje binarne metoda abramowicza Dr. Platt has a unique perspective on the health benefit of a positive attitude. Almost two years ago, while pregnant with her second child, Platt was diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer.

“Trying to keep a good attitude was a huge part of handling with the stress and negativity when I was doing my treatment,” she said. “I think especially in cancer care they are focusing on treating the patient not just with drugs and not just with an oncologist, but also with psychiatry and support groups. They’re looking at it more holistically and I that’s a great thing.”

According to the American Psychological Association, one study shows that, “about half the participants saw improvements in chronic headaches after learning how to stop the stress-producing habit of ‘catastrophizing,’ or constantly thinking negative thoughts about their pain.”

The research shows that a good attitude can help with general health, and further studies suggest that positivity can even help fight against the No. 1 killer in America: heart disease.

A study published in the European Heart Journal, cited by the APA, looked into the relationship between ‘positive affect’– feelings like happiness, joy, contentment and enthusiasm — and the development of coronary heart disease over a decade. The study concluded that, “for every one-point increase in positive affect on a five-point scale, the rate of heart disease dropped by 22 percent.”

Although the study does not prove a direct link between positive affect and decreased heart disease, the correlation is significant, encouraging doctors to further explore the effects of stress on the body.

Stress has also been studied as the root of unhealthy behavior, supporting the idea that stress is more subtly damaging than previously believed. A national study on obesity found that, for many obese people, chronic stress is the central cause of their poor eating habits. The conclusion urged doctors and researchers to access information about lifestyle and stress level when combating obesity, and because obesity is the main cause of many illnesses affecting Americans, the results of this study could mean a national shift in healthcare.

Doctors like Platt are already a part of that shift.

“When I’m dealing with a regular patient, I’ll gauge their stress level and ask them questions like, ‘how do you like your job?’ or ‘how are your relationships at home?’ They’ll respond and say, ‘I’ve never had a doctor ask me that before,’ and I think that’s starting to change as we realize how important it is to regulate stress.”

Platt admits that a good attitude does not guarantee survival, however she does agree that the health benefits of positive thinking are significant.

Stress can’t be completely avoided, but making time to enjoy yourself, to cultivate relationships and to show gratitude can help you manage your stress.

So have fun, de-stress and be healthy!

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